Vegetables and fruits

Vegetables and fruits

Articles & Photos

The first trees were just planted in Beacon Food Forest, a forager-friendly garden in Seattle. With a projected seven acres of fruits, nuts, and vegetables, it will be the nation's largest public edible landscape. 
Our columnist Kevin Lee Jacobs shows us how to build a raised bed garden and explains why it's easy to grow vegetables, flowers, and herbs in these convenient elevated beds. We asked our Facebook fans what they would plant in a raised bed, join the conversation and share your ideas too! 

 

Every May, my husband, Kevin, heads out to our cabin in western Colorado to put in our summer garden. It is his time to fix fences and set the irrigation pipes, to plant the basics I rely on in the kitchen—such as tomatoes, zucchini, and fava beans—and to tend the perennials I use to season them, like oregano, thyme, and sage. Come late June, when I leave our home in New York City to join him for the summer, I take on the garden chores. I work in the early mornings, before the sun gets too hot. I walk across the backyard in my rubber boots, hoe in hand, stepping on the morning glories that blanket the lawn.
Start cooking from your edible garden with these 20 recipes
What’s cooking? Nigel Slater’s new book, Ripe, follows the Brit from his home orchard to his kitchen table. Plus: His recipe for blackberry focaccia!

 

A look at the life-cycle of a rooftop vegetable farm for a Canadian restaurant—complete with hydroponic planters, a hoop house—including the harvest of beautiful vegetables.
Of all the root vegetables I grow, it is the potatoes that give me the biggest thrill at harvest time.  I love to stick my hands in the soil and retrieve the buried bounty, with a yield of eight to ten potatoes for every one that I plant.
Top chefs cook up inspiration in the Edible Garden’s new outdoor kitchen
W. Atlee Burpee & Co. launches I Can Grow, a national program to support a new, popular interest in home vegetable gardening among younger and novice gardeners. 
Hot plus cool equals a jazzy ornamental pepper that’s not pungent, so it’s safe to grow around kids. Indoors it makes a wild “hairdo,” spring through Christmas, of twisty narrow peppers in ivory, yellow, orange and red. Also look for child-friendly ‘Chilly Chili’.
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