Trees

Trees

Articles & Photos

Recent discoveries show that plant roots do much more than carry food and water upward; our notes from the underground talk about the latest discoveries in root science and discoveries. Or as Michele Owens writes "plant roots are arguably the Huffington Posts of the [plant] realm—aggregating the players, reacting to the news, and shaping the conversation to benefit themselves."
Related Topics: Ideas | Plant guide | plants | roots | science | Trees
A fine specimen in a long line of great American roadside attractions, the Tree Circus is a curious orchard that included a birdcage, ladder, spirals, a telephone booth, and a staircase, all fashioned from the pliable branches of birch, ash, elms, and weeping willows. Started in the 1950s in California, the Tree Circus is a neat botanical version in a long history of wacky Californian attractions, including tar pits, dinosaur parks, and the mystery spot.
The loneliest tree in the world was a solitary acacia in a remote land. It was the only tree in a 400 kilometer radius. Standing alone in the vast Saharan expanse, l'Arbre du Ténéré (the Tree of Ténéré), was modest in size—three meters tall—but its mere survival was both remarkable, and invaluable to desert travelers.
There's a bar carved inside the world's largest baobab tree, in the Limpopo province of Modjadjiskloof, South Africa. With room for 50 patrons to sit and have a drink, one might say that what happens in the baobab, stays in the baobab.
How to take care of your plant roots.
Related Topics: Ideas | roots | science | Trees
The world's oldest tree is Methuselah, a 4,741-year-old bristlecone pine in California's White Mountains.
A roundup of tree news, including an iPhone app, great guides, and albino trees.
Related Topics: Products | Decor | ghost trees | Tools | Trees
We tackle whether you should buy a live or cut Christmas tree, plus flower tips, recipes, and more for this Thanksgiving weekend.
The Cultural Landscape Foundation exhibits photographs and stories of irreplaceable trees that have shaped communities and cultures.
Love at first sight is what potter and artist Robin Hopper experienced when he came across a property that he describes as a “mass of misery” 35 years ago. Now lovingly described as “Anglojapanadian,” his property now boasts a family home, art gallery, showroom, and 2.5 acre garden that attracts visitors from around the globe for its strong Japanese and Canadian influences.
Related Topics: Ideas | books | Canada | Japanese | Trees
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