botanic superlatives

botanic superlatives

Articles & Photos

An aspen forest in Utah could be awarded 47,000 blue ribbons that read "World's Largest Tree." That's the number of discrete tree stems that constitute Pando (Latin for "I spread"), a colony of genetically identical aspens that converge underground in a single sprawling root system. Also known as The Trembling Giant, the trees' fluttering leaves are a soft soundtrack in the forest.
The world's oldest tree is Methuselah, a 4,741-year-old bristlecone pine in California's White Mountains.
You probably won't find these flowers at any summer weddings, but the water-dwelling plant would be a perfect accent at the world's tiniest garden party. Sparking like tiny green jewels, each less than a millimeter in diameter, the Wolffia globosa is the smallest flowering plant in the world.
The world's oldest seed bank is near St. Petersburg, Russia. Originally planted by an early 20th century botanist who collected in five continents over 20 years, it's believed that 90% of its seeds can be found no where else. Today, its fate is in jeopardy. 
Glass gem corn was bred years ago by a part-Cherokee farmer and master seed-saver. Yes, it's real, and, as an heirloom, its seeds will grow true. Today, glass gem corn seeds are saved at Seeds Trust, who anticipate more available next month. Glass gem is an extreme iteration of corn's natural tendency towards different-colored kernels, as each kernel has its unique genetic set for color and size. 
The mythologized coco-de-mer (Lodoicea maldivica) tree is a Seychelles Island native palm, and yields the largest seeds (weighing up to 30 kg) in the plant kingdom. The seeds also happen to resemble a woman's curves.
Page 4 of 4