southern california

southern california

Articles & Photos

Stop in for a cup of coffee at a succulent fantasy land featuring a delightful array of plants all growing in unique containers, from old tennis shoes to hanging lanterns. This charming café may be one of a kind.
Related Topics: Visit | southern california | Succulents | Visit

Take a visual stroll through this unusual landscape to see what innovative designers achieve when faced with a huge arid site surrounded on three sides by steep cliffs.

 

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One of California's most impressive Ficus trees is in San Diego—like most figs, it is pollinated by symbiotic wasps that help make your harvest so sweet.
Visit the Disneyland of garden centers, where indoor and outdoor living come together in an explosion of creativity, in Corona del Mar, CA.
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Stan Bitters is a pioneer of the organic modernist craft movement in the 1960s. A look at some of his birdhouses, planters, and fountains that have decorated California gardens over the years.
Tom Kuntz and Jenny Rask hired the Los Angeles–based design firm Commune to transform their home and steep gardens into a series of discreet oases.
Marg Helgenberger, longtime star of CSI, gives her classic Los Angeles garden a second life as a glamorous Mediterranean-style retreat with plenty of space and style for backyard entertaining.
When Marg Helgenberger, the longtime star of CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, was shopping for a new home five ears ago, she found the perfect place in the Los Angeles neighborhood of Brentwood—but the gardens were overgrown and needed to be rethought. Architect Barbara Schnitzler, interior decorator Maggie Marra, and plant consultant Judi Bloom helped Helgenberger transformed the property into a stunning Mediterranean-style house and garden. 
In the foothills of Los Angeles, artists Roy Dowell and Lari Pittman created a garden that's part installation piece and part intimate memoir. 
Maps to the stars! No, wait, maps to...fruit trees? The Los Angeles-based group Fallen Fruit created maps of the city's fruit trees, a reminder that Los Angeles was once organized by boulevards of orchards, not Hollywood and Sunset. It's little locavore, a little urban farmer, and it's a new way to understand a city.
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