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Lines are out the door for the last few days of the Metropolitan Museum's Alexander McQueen show, "Savage Beauty." The natural world was a big inspiration for McQueen's work and we take a look at a few designs from the late, great designer that were directly influenced by flora and fauna.
In artist Miranda Lichtenstein's new series of photographs, Screen Shadows, she photographs silhouettes of still lifes on patterned washi paper screens so the viewer only sees a representation of nature once removed. 
Judy Kameon of Elysian Landscapes, in Los Angeles, tells us about her favorite tool.
Botanic motifs flourished in Victorian design, and typography was no exception. Ornate filigree details and calligraphic embellishments were often designed as stylized flowers, leaves, and even trees, around the alphabet characters. We look at the story behind several typefaces inspired by the natural world.
An outdoor desk chair?  In fact, Charles and Ray Eames’ 1958 aluminums chairs, now so ingrained in office culture, were designed for patios, moving inside only after the seat fabric they tested failed to stand up to weather. With advances in synthetics, Herman Miller is reintroducing the chairs for outside living—and, yes, working. “Mobile technology is changing where and how we work,” says Herman Miller spokesman Mark Schurman.
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True black plants are nonexistent in nature, but some of these sumptuous gems exhibit shades of the deepest purple. For contrast and sheer beauty, they’re intriguing additions to your garden or home.
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Take a look at our slide show of Jonathan Singer's botanic photographs, collected in his book, Botanica Magnifica. The photographs feature rare plant specimens shot on a Hasselblad camera.
The patio in the Barcelona apartment of economist Peter Fehlbaum mixes modernist touches with a healthy dose of quirk. We show you how to get a similar look for your home and garden. 
This chic riff on the Radio Flyer mixes nostalgia with rugged modern materials: marine plywood on an aluminum frame won't mind a little rain, while the synthetic fiber basket stands up to anything you transport, from plants to tools to groceries.
Each year, London's Serpentine Gallery has a temporary pavilion designed by a well-known architect. This year's version is by Pritzker prize winner Peter Zumthor, with a garden by Piet Oudolf—the first time horticulture has joined architecture in the 11 years of the pavilion's history. 
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