landscape architecture

landscape architecture

Articles & Photos

Our book review of Private Paradise: Contemporary American Gardens (Monacelli). This new book featuring 41 residences from around the country and is by Charlotte M. Frieze, the longtime garden editor for the now-defunct House & Garden magazine.
Each year, London's Serpentine Gallery has a temporary pavilion designed by a well-known architect. This year's version is by Pritzker prize winner Peter Zumthor, with a garden by Piet Oudolf—the first time horticulture has joined architecture in the 11 years of the pavilion's history. 
The 9/11 Memorial opens this Sunday to the public, on the tenth anniversary of the attacks. We take a look at the landscape architecture, designed by Peter Walker, in conjunction with the project's architect, Michael Arad.
In Garden Designers at Home, a new tome from Pavilion Books, top designers use their own gardens to hone their craft.
Philadelphia's Rodin Museum sits on the city's Benjamin Franklin Parkway and just unveiled a massive renovation of its gardens by the landscape firm Olin. We take a tour of the newly renovated gardens.
The Growing Home Incentive Program, in New Orleans, gives residents a $10,000 discount off of neighboring lots—provided that they turn it into a garden. Landscape architect Abigail Feldman, the director of the program, talks about some of the amazing changes made in the city through the program.
True Life: Steven Harris Architects, from Princeton Architectual Press, is a retrospective that covers Steven Harris Architects' first twenty-five years. The firm has long made landscape design an integral part of its work, with its in-house landscape unit spun off four years ago as Rees Roberts + Partners. Our review of the book, with a look at three inside spreads.
A plant enthusiast and a history nut, landscape architect Paul Busse uses exclusively botanic material to recreate famous buildings in miniature, building willow twig bridges and cinnamon cantilevers.
A new garden—his own—marks the next step in Piet Oudolf's constantly evolving creative journey. 
In mid-20th-century Sri Lanka, two siblings—the Brothers Bawa—took their own inimitable paths to redefining the tropical garden. This is their story.
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