interior design

interior design

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How do the armchair travelers among us create Michael Trapp’s Old World mash-up look in our own gardens without devolving into mishmash? Give the space some structure, Trapp suggests. “Keep clean lines and have some formality,” he advises, “and soften with plant material.” While adhering to that underlying layout, feel free to add architectural elements, like old stone edging or columns, or purchase a few antique pieces like a teak garden bench. Don’t be afraid to mix indoor décor, such as cushions and textiles, with outdoor furniture.

Trapp’s own store is a great resource for antiques, but he also recommends retailers like Target, Restoration Hardware, and Pottery Barn for affordable, more contemporary accessories. “They carry a younger mix of items that pair well with older pieces,” he says. Take a look at the accents and furnishings that make Michael Trapp's home and garden a curious place.

Related Topics: Ideas | antiques | interior design
Sun printing on fabric lets you use the plants in your garden to create beautiful patterns, and the resulting fabric can be made into clothing or a framed work of art. We teach you how to make a cyanotype with step-by-step instructions.
A look at the wallpapers and the Brooklyn studio (including a rooftop garden) of Flavor Paper, a hand-screened and digital wallpaper company.
John Sherman's Flavor Lair, the studio space for his wallpaper company Flavor Paper, is in one of Brooklyn's most design-savvy buildings. 
A room decorated with William Morris's colorful patterns offers a certain reassurance: teatime will always be sunny. The nineteenth-century designer applied his exquisite flora-based designs to textiles, tiles, and, of course, wallpaper. As if throwing open the heavy drapes, he ushered nature's forms inside the home.