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We talk with photographer Michel Tcherevkoff about his collection of imagined floral shoes, Shoe Fleur.
Severin Roesen is recognized as one of America's preeminent still-life painters and several of his meticulously detailed paintings are included in the Metropolitan Museum of Art's new American Wing. 
At age 72, 18th-century British artist Mary Delany began her floral collages. In an age of decoupage and floral paintings, her intricate paper art was a nod to both, and a new style of botanic art. 
A dramatic accent to modern-day gardens, Acanthus plants were also the inspiration for Corinthian columns, the art of William Morris, and mid-century motifs. 
In the last several years, artists have reclaimed moss as a medium, creating site-specific installations to reclaim public spaces, and creating a new sort of growing, living graffiti.
Albrecht Dürer's paintings are accurate depictions of native plants and weeds, and a rare example of art showing plants in their natural environment in the 16th century.
Related Topics: Ideas | art + botany | illustration | Weeds
Biologist and artist Ernst Haeckel introduced the term "ecology," and pursued his study of the natural world with a scientist's rigor and an artist's philosophy. He traveled around the world to find botanic specimens and illustrated them as perfect forms and unifying patterns. 
In the late 1500s, the illustrator Johann Theodor de Bry produced a rare series of six still-life floral prints, titled Polyptoton de Flores (The Variance of Flowers). The captions are scripted in Latin hexameter, and derive their lessons from various phases of a plant's life cycle.
Published in 1847, Les Fleurs Animées imagines a world where the flowers reclaim the meanings bestowed upon them by a covetous Victorian audience, and become actresses in their own drama. In J.J. Grandville's engraved illustrations, an exotic Lady Tulip bewitches, while fair young Forget-Me-Not mourns her loneliness.
Edward Gorey's The Evil Garden (Pomegranate, March 2011) is a cautionary tale for botanic enthusiasts everywhere: Beckoned by the delights of a lush, enticing garden, a family traipses through nature's alluring gate toward the promise of a flowering sanctuary. But any notions of floral delights are replaced with grave encounters when the plants turn bad.
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