History

History

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On the mainland, celebrities get a Hollywood star; in Hawai'i, it's a tree on Banyan Drive. 
Related Topics: Ideas | banyan | botanic notables | fig | hawai'i | History | Travel
An intrepid naturalist and botanic illustrator, Mary Vaux Walcott explored the Rocky Mountains to paint its wildflowers. 
Crazy bonsai architecture, an Arctic flower blooms again (after 32,000 years), a new record for a snowdrop bulb (more than $1,145!), and NPR's interview about the Iraqi Seed Project.
Related Topics: Ideas | bonsai | History | links | links we love | plants | snowdrops
With its red and white blossoms, the York and Lancaster rose (Rosa damascena versicolor) marked the end of the War of the Roses, and symbolized the union of feuding families, each with their own rose: the House of York, with its white rose, and the House of Lancaster, with its red rose. 
In honor of football and chrysanthemum season, we bow before a floral tradition specific to Texas: homecoming mums. 
The Temple of Flora is perhaps the most famous florilegium or book of flowers from the golden age of botanical illustration. It's a charming collection of deliberately idiosyncratic flower portraits that became the portrait of a nation.
We've all seen neat tree houses, but did you know that there's a tree church? In France, the Chêne Chappelle (Chapel Oak) is 800 years old, houses two tiny chapels in its hollow trunk, and was said to have been visited by William the Conqueror himself.
The Miller House, designed by Eero Saarinen, has a landmark Modernist garden designed by Dan Kiley. This month, May 2011, the house and garden are opening to the public for tours for the first time in 50 years, allowing visitors to walk through this triumph of mid-century Modern design.
This week, we link to a bit of absolutely fascinating forgotten history: atomic gardens, which were an attempt to find peaceful uses for atomic energy after WWII by radiating seeds and plants to create new mutations. Plus: A timeline of British gardening and preserving the view at Hudson Valley's Olana.
A plant enthusiast and a history nut, landscape architect Paul Busse uses exclusively botanic material to recreate famous buildings in miniature, building willow twig bridges and cinnamon cantilevers.
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