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Connecting the ancient world with 21st century garden design, relics of the time such as rustic urns and pots can bring the romance of the ancient world into your garden.

 

Israeli artist Ori Gersht uses natural subjects to embody peace, beauty, and luxury. His flowers, forests, and fruits are edens, disrupted by a dark world. His first museum survey is at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston through January 6th. 
To look at a history of botanic illustration is to look at the changing significance of a plant over time. A new exhibit at Lotusland, in Montecito, California, does just this. Historic prints document these transitional periods—of plant as medical specimen, to exotic beauty, to garden delight—in a show titled "The Plant Hunters: Botanical Illustrations from the 16th to 19th Centuries," which runs through November 2.
A photographic tour of the beautiful gardens of two Sri Lankan brothers: architect Geoffrey Bawa's Lunuganga, an English-style folly, and Bevis Bawa's Brief Garden, an unusual series of jungle garden rooms. 
The recently adopted official city plant of Los Angeles is the toyon, a red-berried shrub known as California holly (Heteromeles arbutifolia), the one that put the "holly" in Hollywood.
Three presidents, three trees, three histories: Andew Jackson's southern magnolia, Abraham Lincoln's honey locust, and George Washington's tulip poplar.
GARDEN DESIGN is once again an educational partner with Landslide, the Cultural Landscape Foundation's annual thematic compendium of at-risk landscapes. Learn about this annual event, which highlights landscapes that are being threatened, including the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden (above), which was spotlighted in 2009, and luckily, saved in 2011. Remember to submit your nominations for this year's Landslide. Nominations are due May 31, 2012. 
Before there was Instagram, there was the Claude glass—a small, tinted, convex mirror that was popular in the 18th century. Toted in artists' cases and tourists' pockets, the portable mirror offered a transformed view of the scenery that became popular with wealthy British vacationers—a world viewed through a Claude glass was a journey through ephemeral snapshots of softly-rendered nostalgia. 

 

 

 

Landscape architect Jens Jensen (1860 to 1951), designer of numerous parks in Chicago (and around the country), including the Garfield Park Conservatory (above), is the subject of a new documentary, Jens Jensen: Harmonious World, which will be shown on PBS this fall. 
Ancient pollen grains preserved on the site of a royal palace in Jerusalem have given researchers a vision of 7th century B.C garden opiulence: a lush paradise with surprising exotics and traitional species. 
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