England

England

Articles & Photos

Built with mud, rocks, and plants, the extraordinary sculptures by sister and brother team Sue Hill and Pete Hill are living figures that suggest a fairy tale in the undergrowth. 
In Garden Designers at Home, a new tome from Pavilion Books, top designers use their own gardens to hone their craft.
The Temple of Flora is perhaps the most famous florilegium or book of flowers from the golden age of botanical illustration. It's a charming collection of deliberately idiosyncratic flower portraits that became the portrait of a nation.
Photos from the 2011 New York Botanical Garden's 21st Annual Patron Lecture, which featured Fergus Garrett, the head gardener of Great Dixter House and Gardens in East Sussex, England.
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A look at some of the gardens at the 2011 Chelsea Flower Show.
A human touch inhabits the sweeping gestures of the British landscape designer Jinny Blom:

 

"Take risks. If someone tells you something is impossible, see if you can do it. Gardening is a knife edge between disaster and serendipity."

In this garden, just 40 minutes from London, Jinny Blom converted a neglected hilltop farm into a garden of exquisitely designed rooms with an astonishing grand finale, overlooking a wide valley in the high chalklands.
Jinny Blom's gardens at Temple Guiting, a 15th-century manor in Gloucestershire, England, won her a Pinnacle Award, with dry-stone walls that divide the 14-acre site into 18 "rooms," each with a distinct style and story to tell.
A new sculpture trail in Pendle Hill, England winds through the rural landscape and commemorates the 400th anniversary of an historic witch hunt. The site-specific pieces were designed with local materials and inspired by Pendle Hill's dark history. 
Commissioned by the city of London to replace a dying sycamore tree, the Traffic Light Tree has 75 signals that bewilder birds and confuse motorists—doing everything but directing traffic. 
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