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Design

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True Life: Steven Harris Architects, from Princeton Architectual Press, is a retrospective that covers Steven Harris Architects' first twenty-five years. The firm has long made landscape design an integral part of its work, with its in-house landscape unit spun off four years ago as Rees Roberts + Partners. Our review of the book, with a look at three inside spreads.
Artist Lawrence Weiner's house in New York's West Village has windows and a penthouse (which overlooks a rooftop garden) built with truck containers. The penthouse is part of a beautiful renovation by architects LOT-EK.
Related Topics: Ideas | architecture | Design | New York | Rooftop garden
As anyone who's emerged from a forest stroll with a sleeve covered in burdock burrs will agree, the wonderful story of Velcro's genesis is too familiar to be apocryphal.
Afternoon inspiration: This summer house in Mar Azul, Buenos Aires, Argentina, was built by BAK architects. The house wraps around the trees that grow on the property, integrating nature into a very modern house structure.
These moss knuckle dusters can't decide whether they're tough or soft—real moss grows on top of this four knuckle ring.
Faster than a speeding bullet! The Bunchberry dogwood is able to launch pollen into the air in a third of the time it takes a bullet to leave a rifle barrel, making the plant (Cornus canadensis) a superlative example of botanic ballistics, engineering, and reproductive design.
A temporary house made from a pipe frame and vegetable crates had living walls and a living roof covered with fresh vegetables that could be directly harvested from this "greenhouse."
Inspired by the natural world, artist Sasha Prood has illustrated an alphabet by drawing plants that naturally fall into the shapes of the letters. Garden Design interviews Prood about her work and her plant muses.
These cool, custom-made necklaces have little planters that can hold a bit of soil and a plant, and were developed by a recent graduate of Georgia Tech.
Related Topics: Products | Design | Etsy | gifts | jewelry | planters
The marriage of the words “aesthetic” and “edibles” have become more frequent as many gardeners, chefs, and authors alike embrace the function and form of edible design in gardening. Christina Salwitz explains why there no longer needs to be the horticultural separation of delicious looking and delicious tasting landscapes.
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