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An exhibit of contemporary topiary pieces is on display at this year's International Horticulture Expo, in Xi’an, China. The menagerie of living sculptures includes the country's national bird, a giant panda, and a cow.  
Related Topics: Ideas | Green | Anna Laurent | art botany | asia | china | Design | Topiary
During the great tulipomania craze, a vase was designed to showcase the expensive flowers. 
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Has London one-upped Paris when it comes to vertical gardens on museum walls? The National Gallery in London unveiled a vertical garden that is a living reproduction of Van Gogh's "A Wheatfield, with Cypresses," using 8,000 living plants of more than 26 varieties.
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The artist collective London Fieldworks has been creating fantastic bird houses since 2008, sculptures that draw from sources as diverse as 1960s public housing, dictator's palaces, and more.
Related Topics: Ideas | art | birdhouses | Design | London
A physician by trade, botanic enthusiast, and accidental inventor, Nathaniel Bagshaw Ward devised the first terrarium in 1829, and thereby launched a new age of horticultural possibilities—where ferns and mosses would grow indoors, and tropical exotics would travel the world. 
At the University of Stuttgart, Germany, a new architectural discipline is evolving, with leaves, branches, and roots. The research group is called Baubotanik (Botanic Architecture), and it is where the architects are gardeners, and the plants are architects. 
A room decorated with William Morris's colorful patterns offers a certain reassurance: teatime will always be sunny. The nineteenth-century designer applied his exquisite flora-based designs to textiles, tiles, and, of course, wallpaper. As if throwing open the heavy drapes, he ushered nature's forms inside the home. 
Frank Lloyd Wright designed Hollyhock House with a stylized motif of the flower, which grow alongside the Los Angeles landmark building. The effect is a beautiful symmetry of architecture and nature, with a surprising unity of character: somehow, the concrete hollyhocks look no less elegant than the living flowers reflected beneath them.
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Ever wish there was a Shazam for trees? LeafSnap is a new mobile app that can identify a tree's species by looking at a photograph of its leaf. It's a field guide for the twenty-first century, which uses facial recognition algorithms to analyze the leaf's contour so it can find a match from its index of species.
A master of communication, graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister uses flowers and leaves arranged to convey his personal axioms.
Related Topics: Ideas | Green | Orange | Pink | White | art botany | Design | language | typography
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