bouquets

bouquets

Articles & Photos

The Victorian language of flowers meant that you could express a wide range of sentiments with a simple floral nosegay. On Valentine's Day, the sweetest of holidays, we take a look at some popular flowers to include in a bouquet and how they speak the language of love.
Now that Labor Day is behind us and the kids are heading back to school, Katherine Anderson of Marigold and Mint creates a few late summer flower arrangements with three favorite flowers of the season: sunflowers, zinnias, and dahlias.
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The bouquet! The trees in Westminster Abbey! The bridesmaids' wreaths! (Oh, and did we mention that we did a DIY last week on almost exactly the same lily-of-the-valley wreaths? We wonder if the British Royal Family is reading gardendesign.com—welcome ma'am!)
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This is the post where we shamelessly give in to our interest in the upcoming royal wedding. We take a look at the wedding bouquets of Queen Victoria, Queen Elizabeth, Princess Diana, and Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, and speculate about what Kate Middleton might carry when she walks down the aisle April 29. if you're interested in all things royal,  leave a comment about what flowers you think Kate might choose!
Roses are the most popular flower for Valentine's Day, but did you know that different hues and varieties of roses have different meanings? If you're wondering how to best convey your passionate love, your chaste yearning, or alternatively, your disappointment in your relationship, there's a rose for you.
Our “A-list” party experts show you how to make your holiday table the talk of the town.