botanic superlatives

botanic superlatives

Articles & Photos

Making its home in a variety of climates, including your own garden or Northern Ireland, the purple saxifrage (Saxifraga oppositifolia) grows happily even in the harshest of climates, making it the only small flowering plant to survive one of the highest and coldest altitudes in the world - the arctic tundra of the Swiss Alps.

A tiny, inedible berry with long-lasting iridescence has been awarded the superlative title of Brightest Living Thing on Earth.
A living wall in Milan was recently granted the superlative title of world's largest. Designed by architect Francesco Bollani, the vertical garden carpets 13,600 square feet of an Italian mall's facade.
Drielandenpunt Labyrinth, or Three-Country Labyrinth, is Europe's largest open air shrub maze, and its hilltop location in the Netherlands—the highest point in the country—offers a stunning view of Belgium, Germany, and the Netherlands. Designed by landscape architect Adrian Fisher, the labyrinth pays homage to the location's infamous popularity with smugglers. 
Visitors to the Poison Garden at Alnwick Castle are greeted with a big black gate that warns "These Plants May Kill." Lurking beyond the miasmatic fog is a collection of over 100 botanic assassins & intoxicants that include the legendary deadly nightshade, strychnine, and mandrake, as well as ubiquitous garden plants like foxglove, datura, and laburnum.
A Victorian-era menagerie still grows today, at an historic country estate in Portsmouth, Rhode Island. With its century-old living sculptures, Green Animals Garden is the oldest topiary garden in the United States. 
The world's largest treehouse is a 97-foot-high chapel in Crossville, Tennessee. Minister Horace Burgess began building in 1993; today, he continues to make improvements and repairs with salvage wood and repurposed materials. It's a popular place for Sunday services, weddings, and, swinging on an 80-foot tall tree. 
Ancient pollen grains preserved on the site of a royal palace in Jerusalem have given researchers a vision of 7th century B.C garden opiulence: a lush paradise with surprising exotics and traitional species. 
A 385 million-year old forest, the world's oldest, was recently excavated in an upstate New York quarry.
The famous Tree House at Pitchford is said to be the oldest one in the world. 
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