botanic notables

botanic notables

Articles & Photos

The teddy-bear cholla (Opuntia bigelovii) cactus has evolved barbed arms that will detach and cling to just about anything, in the hopes of traveling to a new place to root and begin a new colony.  
Related Topics: Ideas | botanic notables | cactus | California | cholla | Desert
The first trees were just planted in Beacon Food Forest, a forager-friendly garden in Seattle. With a projected seven acres of fruits, nuts, and vegetables, it will be the nation's largest public edible landscape. 
The hills of Japan's Hitachi Flower Park blossom bright with about 30,000 bushes of Kochia, a bush whose leaves and stems turn red in October. A couple million light pink and white cosmos bloom alongside in the park's 153 hectacres. 
Adored, feared, and fabled, the oleander is a deadly beauty. Drought-tolerant and easily propagated, it is commonly cultivated in gardens and public spaces in subtropical and tropical regions throughout the world and it is also considered to be one of history's deadliest plants. 
Related Topics: Ideas | botanic notables | flower | oleander | poisonous
The bluebonnet is a smart, strong flower, and, thanks to a state's embrace, a true Texan. And because they love them so, there are six bluebonnets recognized as state flowers.
The state of Minnesota has 43 species of native orchids. Its rarest orchid is called the Queen's Lady Slipper, which reigns in the state's bogs and damp woods. 
Kentucky is known as the Bluegrass State, for a grass that flowers blue and yet the grass in Kentucky is generally...green. Our Botanic Notable column this week takes a look at the plant that gave a whole genre of music its name.
The Bodhi Tree is a sacred fig under which Buddha found enlightenment, and the Sri Maha Bodhi tree in Sri Lanka, grown from a cutting of the Bodhi Tree, is considered the oldest tree planted by human hands and is more than 2,000 years old. These two botanically notable trees have a sacred and interesting history.
Rambling over the desert steppe and into our romantic visions of the American West, the iconic tumbleweed is the Clint Eastwood of plants—an itinerant survivor that seems to thrive on solitude, parched land, and a mean wind. 
Related Topics: Ideas | botanic notables | Desert | tumbleweeds
Queen Anne's Lace is a weed, but an undeniably beautiful one, whose botanic descendent is the domesticated carrot, and named for the royal lace-maker Queen Anne of Scotland. 
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