art + botany

art + botany

Articles & Photos

A tribute album for a botanist? Carl Linnaeus—a botanist who named pretty plants for his friends and ugly plants for his enemies—knew the power of a name, and he would certainly be pleased that this modern Swedish folk music album bears his. 
Related Topics: Ideas | Anna Laurent | art + botany | linnaeus | Sweden
Botanic motifs flourished in Victorian design, and typography was no exception. Ornate filigree details and calligraphic embellishments were often designed as stylized flowers, leaves, and even trees, around the alphabet characters. We look at the story behind several typefaces inspired by the natural world.
Related Topics: Ideas | art + botany | Design | typography | Victorian
The Temple of Flora is perhaps the most famous florilegium or book of flowers from the golden age of botanical illustration. It's a charming collection of deliberately idiosyncratic flower portraits that became the portrait of a nation.
Related Topics: Ideas | art + botany | books | Britain | England | florilegium | History
In the last several years, artists have reclaimed moss as a medium, creating site-specific installations to reclaim public spaces, and creating a new sort of growing, living graffiti.
Albrecht Dürer's paintings are accurate depictions of native plants and weeds, and a rare example of art showing plants in their natural environment in the 16th century.
Related Topics: Ideas | art + botany | illustration | Weeds
Biologist and artist Ernst Haeckel introduced the term "ecology," and pursued his study of the natural world with a scientist's rigor and an artist's philosophy. He traveled around the world to find botanic specimens and illustrated them as perfect forms and unifying patterns. 
A San Francisco artist is breeding a new genus of art and botany: a hybrid of man's plumbing with woman's tulips. 
Related Topics: Ideas | art + botany | Design | Flowers | Interior | sculpture
Steven N. Meyers, a medical X-ray technologist, uses radiography techniques to botanic specimens, capturing the elegant portraits of plants and their insides that would otherwise go unseen.
At the University of Stuttgart, Germany, a new architectural discipline is evolving, with leaves, branches, and roots. The research group is called Baubotanik (Botanic Architecture), and it is where the architects are gardeners, and the plants are architects. 
Frank Lloyd Wright designed Hollyhock House with a stylized motif of the flower, which grow alongside the Los Angeles landmark building. The effect is a beautiful symmetry of architecture and nature, with a surprising unity of character: somehow, the concrete hollyhocks look no less elegant than the living flowers reflected beneath them.
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