Ideas

Ideas
From our garden to yours, we share inspiration from around the world for gardens big and small.
This modern roof terrace in Italy is an oasis of relaxation designed by landscape architect Gabriella Mazzola
Now that it is past the autumnal equinox we begin to think of coziness and warmth as the days begin to get shorter and cooler.
From a “forest floor” to the canopy of trees, this secret outdoor room provides deep shades of green
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Articles & Photos

Sarah Ryhanen, the force behind Brooklyn's super-stylish Saipua flower shop, talks about how she started creating a cutting garden in containers, in front of her store and her apartment building.
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A glacier, a rainforest, and a forest of upside-down trees—naturally fallen spruce and hemlock, repurposed as flower pots—are some of the wonders in Alaska's Mendenhall Valley.
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Florigelia were popular in the seventeeth century. Often illustrated by eminent artists, the lavishly produced books catalogued the plants in a garden, or collected on an expedition. Who can afford to produce such a book today? A prince, of course. His Royal Highness, Prince Charles of Wales, who sponsored The Highgrove Florilegium, a collection of plants in the royal garden, and one of the most expensive books of modern times. 
An energy-conscious “flower”, Caribbean produce in Brooklyn, mini gardening tools, and more in today’s Links We Love!

 

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Tips and advice on adding plants to a natural pool. 
Arboreal portraits that awaken a sense of mystery and communion. 
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London-based artist Simon Heijdens explores the ecology of objects, and introduces the narrative of the natural world to the built environment. His garden of 'digital, living organisms,' evolves with a gust of wind or a passerby.
A mini-golf course unlike any other, volcanic rivers in Iceland, fall leaves compost, and more in today’s Links We Love!

 

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How do the armchair travelers among us create Michael Trapp’s Old World mash-up look in our own gardens without devolving into mishmash? Give the space some structure, Trapp suggests. “Keep clean lines and have some formality,” he advises, “and soften with plant material.” While adhering to that underlying layout, feel free to add architectural elements, like old stone edging or columns, or purchase a few antique pieces like a teak garden bench. Don’t be afraid to mix indoor décor, such as cushions and textiles, with outdoor furniture.

Trapp’s own store is a great resource for antiques, but he also recommends retailers like Target, Restoration Hardware, and Pottery Barn for affordable, more contemporary accessories. “They carry a younger mix of items that pair well with older pieces,” he says. Take a look at the accents and furnishings that make Michael Trapp's home and garden a curious place.

Related Topics: Ideas | Blue | Green | Orange | antiques | interior design
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