Ideas

Ideas
From our garden to yours, we share inspiration from around the world for gardens big and small.
This modern roof terrace in Italy is an oasis of relaxation designed by landscape architect Gabriella Mazzola
Now that it is past the autumnal equinox we begin to think of coziness and warmth as the days begin to get shorter and cooler.
From a “forest floor” to the canopy of trees, this secret outdoor room provides deep shades of green
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Articles & Photos

Tips and advice on adding plants to a natural pool. 
Arboreal portraits that awaken a sense of mystery and communion. 
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London-based artist Simon Heijdens explores the ecology of objects, and introduces the narrative of the natural world to the built environment. His garden of 'digital, living organisms,' evolves with a gust of wind or a passerby.
A mini-golf course unlike any other, volcanic rivers in Iceland, fall leaves compost, and more in today’s Links We Love!

 

Related Topics: Ideas | Green | Pink | links we love
How do the armchair travelers among us create Michael Trapp’s Old World mash-up look in our own gardens without devolving into mishmash? Give the space some structure, Trapp suggests. “Keep clean lines and have some formality,” he advises, “and soften with plant material.” While adhering to that underlying layout, feel free to add architectural elements, like old stone edging or columns, or purchase a few antique pieces like a teak garden bench. Don’t be afraid to mix indoor décor, such as cushions and textiles, with outdoor furniture.

Trapp’s own store is a great resource for antiques, but he also recommends retailers like Target, Restoration Hardware, and Pottery Barn for affordable, more contemporary accessories. “They carry a younger mix of items that pair well with older pieces,” he says. Take a look at the accents and furnishings that make Michael Trapp's home and garden a curious place.

Related Topics: Ideas | Blue | Green | Orange | antiques | interior design
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A flower's demise is a slow process—unless you're photographer Jon Shireman, in which case it happens with a quick pivot and a smash. He immerses his flowers to stiffen them, then flings them against a hard surface. The shattered remains are beautiful.
Laser-cut vases, beautiful photographs exploring the “edge effect”, London’s possible future low-line park, and more in today’s Links We Love!

 

Related Topics: Ideas | links we love
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The sixth installment of Dwell on Design, the Los Angeles showcase of modern, sustainable ideas, featured a wide range of stylish, practical green goods, some quietly cutting-edge, others wonderfully wild. 
Related Topics: Ideas | Blue | copper | Gray | Green | Red | White | Modern | dwell on design | Modern
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A fan of grafting and citrus fruits, I've been pursuing the legendary Tree of Many Fruits for some time now, and have yet to find one. Now I could have one in my backyard. Like many of my favorite trees, it hails from Australia. James and Kerry West, farmers in New South Wales, have been cultivating "fruit salad trees," each of which produce several kinds of fruits. 
To look at a history of botanic illustration is to look at the changing significance of a plant over time. A new exhibit at Lotusland, in Montecito, California, does just this. Historic prints document these transitional periods—of plant as medical specimen, to exotic beauty, to garden delight—in a show titled "The Plant Hunters: Botanical Illustrations from the 16th to 19th Centuries," which runs through November 2.
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