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How to make arrangements using herbs and spring flowers that are perfect for the Passover or Easter table.
A new crop of outdoor seating looks and feels good enough to take inside.
Unseasonably warm weather has led to a prolonged summer harvest. Make the best of it by cooking up a spicy, delicious succotash. 
An expensive spice with a long history of famous anointments and international trade, saffron is actually nothing more than the dried stigmas of a crocus flower. 
Debra Prinzing, author of the new book The 50 Mile Bouquet: Seasonal, Local and Sustainable Flowers, gives us flower-buying tips for the footprint-conscious. 
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Our Q&A with Judy Kameon about how she gets the party started in her quarter-acre garden, in Los Angeles. Plus: Our guide to recreating her garden's style at home.  
Australian plants are like the ultimate self-sacrificing mother: They give and give (certain trees can reach 20 feet in just a few years and flower for six weeks or more) but ask so little in return. (Fertilizer? Rain? If you insist.) Their fantastical forms, however—including sculptural, hairy, or waxy blooms in neon colors—are anything but matronly.    
Tips and advice on adding plants to a natural pool. 
A black-eyed Susan amped to the max. Heads of narrow, quilled golden petals look like a cheerleader’s pom-pom. Blooms summer through fall, 18 inches tall. Hardy to Zone 5a.
Lilac blue with a cream face, deep-purple blotch and clutch of whiskers, Viola Sorbet Marina Babyface is sweet beyond belief, and fragrant too. Forms a mound 6 inches high and up to 10 inches across; flowers are an inch or more wide. Very frost tolerant.
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