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Think your roses were tough to train? Visit the New York Botanical Garden now through November 14 to see this ozukuri, with 464 blossoms grown from one stem.
Roses are the most popular flower for Valentine's Day, but did you know that different hues and varieties of roses have different meanings? If you're wondering how to best convey your passionate love, your chaste yearning, or alternatively, your disappointment in your relationship, there's a rose for you.
Faster than a speeding bullet! The Bunchberry dogwood is able to launch pollen into the air in a third of the time it takes a bullet to leave a rifle barrel, making the plant (Cornus canadensis) a superlative example of botanic ballistics, engineering, and reproductive design.
How to make arrangements using herbs and spring flowers that are perfect for the Passover or Easter table.
Cumulus Studios invites contemporary fine artists to create limited-edition outdoor pieces that reflect founder and landscape designer Nathalie Karg's connections with the art world.
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Creating striking arrangements doesn't take a genius—or a florist. Our step-by-step guide about how to DIY flower centerpieces at home.
The state of Minnesota has 43 species of native orchids. Its rarest orchid is called the Queen's Lady Slipper, which reigns in the state's bogs and damp woods. 
Our final What Makes a House a Home column is from photographers and brand-new parents Gemma and Andrew Ingalls. You've seen their photography in GARDEN DESIGN magazine (including on our November/December cover) and we're thrilled to share their apartment and magnificent houseplants with you.
Paula Hayes, the terrarium artist, currently has an exhibit of two of her large-scale works at Lever House, in New York, running until February. She will also has a monograph of her work published in April 2012.
Written by French botanists who explored North American forests in the late 1700s, The North American Sylva is a monumental work with masterful illustrations and extensive botanic profiles. The book would help France reforest its post-war countryside, and become a landmark in North American forestry. Today, it remains readable and interesting—certainly a work of evergreen value. 
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