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Michael Greenwood builds tree houses that have unusual features, such as a 50-foot chute that slides riders from the tree to the forest floor.
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A steep and ramshackle plot of land is transformed into a peaceful retreat.
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The American chestnut tree has dominated Eastern forests for centuries, but it almost disappeared when a foreign blight was introduced in 1904. Scientists have been trying to breed blight-resistant trees and recently planted several at the New York Botanical Garden, just steps from the blight's origins over one hundred years ago. 
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Brooklyn keeps growing (its gardens).
Textile designer Jack Lenor Larsen brings an eclectic sensibility to his lush public garden in the Hamptons.
It is an electric moment to be shaken from musing over the usual offerings at a local garden center by a plant I’ve never heard of before. It’s like hiking in familiar woods and having the compass needle go haywire. In this case, the plant tag combined the words “succulent,” “African” and “hosta” — I had to have it.
The owners of this Portland, Oregon, garden want to connect people with the Earth
A plant enthusiast and a history nut, landscape architect Paul Busse uses exclusively botanic material to recreate famous buildings in miniature, building willow twig bridges and cinnamon cantilevers.
Four gardeners recommend their favorite trowels and tell us why they love it.
A new crop of outdoor seating looks and feels good enough to take inside.
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