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9
The bio bus, a mobile science laboratory that travels around New York and the Midwest, providing science education to schoolchildren, also has a living, growing roof that is both aesthetically and functionally green—reclaiming common urban space and transforming it into a moveable garden. Created by Marco Castro Cosio, this living bus roof (his digital prototype is shown above) is an unusual take on green roofs.
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Rebecca Burgess's Fibershed challenge—to wear clothes that are farmed, created, and dyed with materials made within 150 miles of her front door—takes the idea of living locally and buying American to a whole new level. We report on her project, including her garden of indigo plants grown to create natural blue dyes.
Fire is generally the death knell for many plants, but the beautiful flowering shrubs and trees of the genus Banksia are adapted to even thrive in wildfires—in fact, the plants need fire to reproduce.
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Party pictures from our unveiling of the James Beard Foundation House's garden renovation!
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Laura Harmon, a new blogger, shares with us the story of the King Street Lots, public gardens that flourished for 13 years in an series of abandoned lots in Red Hook, Brooklyn, New York. It's a story of perseverance in an ephemeral garden.
Our review of the new book of inspirational photos from well-known garden photographer Andrea Jones. 
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Before there was Instagram, there was the Claude glass—a small, tinted, convex mirror that was popular in the 18th century. Toted in artists' cases and tourists' pockets, the portable mirror offered a transformed view of the scenery that became popular with wealthy British vacationers—a world viewed through a Claude glass was a journey through ephemeral snapshots of softly-rendered nostalgia. 

 

 

 

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John G. Fairey, a flora collector with a rare eye for design, transformed a Texas landscape into the famed garden Peckerwood. His vision for Peckerwood, which includes a light-dappled woodland, several shimmering dry gardens, and a parklike arboretum, developed not gradually but in a transformative awakening during a trip to Mexico. This is the story of a plant man and his garden.

 

In a series of guest posts, San Francisco's Academy of Art University will lend its landscape architecture knowledge to Garden Design. Its first post is a handy one—tips on how to help revive a struggling garden. 
Love, marriage, and mycology.
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