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149
Sun printing on fabric lets you use the plants in your garden to create beautiful patterns, and the resulting fabric can be made into clothing or a framed work of art. We teach you how to make a cyanotype with step-by-step instructions.
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In honor of football and chrysanthemum season, we bow before a floral tradition specific to Texas: homecoming mums. 
Landscaped entirely out of cypress and eucalyptus, the enormous guitar is one Argentine farmer's love letter to his late wife, a young woman who loved the guitar.
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Contemporary Swiss artists Gerda Steiner and Jorg Lenzlinger hung flowers, seeds, and branches in a 17th-century church in Venice as part of the 50th Venice Biennale. They called it Falling Garden, a world in which visitors lie in repose on the mausoleum floor, while "the garden thinks for them." 
A new outdoor aesthetic emerges at the Milan Furniture Fair.
A bit of knowledge goes a long way when it comes to buying a garden ornament; read our Q&A with garden antique expert, Barbara Israel, for some tips. 

 

From German grower Dümmen comes a cornucopia of fruit-inspired African daisies, with tasty names like Blueberry and Cranberry. Purple and fuchsia petals have an iridescent look, with dark violet-blue centers. Typically used as an annual.

Landscape designer Stephen Suzman likes the groundcover species Senecio mandraliscae for its fast growth and distinctive chalky-blue fleshy foliage. A native of South Africa, it grows 12 to 18 inches tall with masses of 3- to 4-inch pencil-like leaves. For more, visit Great Garden Plants.

The landmark work of British botanist Anna Atkins paved the way for a new field of botanic photography.
A new book by interior designer Florence De Dampierre, Walls: The Best of Decorative Treatments ($60, Rizzoli), chronicles our impulse to decorate with frescoes, paneling, tapestry, or wallpaper, often devoted to flora.
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