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Peonies sell out fast, with yellow tree peonies going first. You can preorder herbaceous peonies now, and tree peonies are available spring through fall, as well as the hybrid Itohs or intersectionals. We take a quick look at the history of yellow peonies and why they command such high prices, as well as a reminder to start ordering new varieties for your garden.
GDAB SealInterior decorator Claudia Juestel visits home furnishing designer Sandra Jordan’s 1916 New-England-style farmhouse in Healdsburg, California, with artichoke and cactus fields, escargot farm, and expansive fruit and flower gardens.
Now that Labor Day is behind us and the kids are heading back to school, Katherine Anderson of Marigold and Mint creates a few late summer flower arrangements with three favorite flowers of the season: sunflowers, zinnias, and dahlias.
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Today's My Garden is a charming collection of dwarf Japanese Maples and bonsai in a small pocket of Zone 6 in Ohio.
Inspired by Garrett Eckbo, an iconic midcentury landscape architect who broke down the boundaries between indoor and outdoor living, we show you how to get this look for your home with modern furnishings.
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A new line of stands and planters offer the perfect amount of illumination at night, by absorbing sunlight all day, eliminating a need for wires or outlets.
Tagua (pronounced tog-wah) nuts, or "ivory of the rainforest," are a vegetable-based and sustainable alternative to elephant ivory. The seeds are hard and smooth, and easily carved and dyed. They were once used for military buttons, Victorian chess pieces, and dice. Today, tagua "vegetable ivory" is a popular material for jewelry and baubles. 
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Want to know when your favorite produce is in season? Designer and chef Russell van Kraayenburg illustrated a series of infographic posters that will help.
With the tongue-twisting official name of Euphorbia martini ‘Waleutiny’, it’s no wonder this cushion spurge has acquired a much cuter appellation. Looking like a Koosh Ball, ‘Tiny Tim” forms a perfect 1-foot dome of narrow blue-green leaves and a cloud of greenish-yellow bracts cupped under little red flowers. Unlike many spurges, this one continues to bloom throughout the season. Zones 6-8.
This is one of the most unusual and striking violas you'll ever see, with an inky lacework of veining etched across a golden background. Forms a neat mound 4 to 6 inches high and wide, with numerous 1-inch flowers. The entire Angel series from British grower Floranova is undaunted by cold weather and can take heat better than cousin pansy, so they're perfect for taking the garden from early fall into late spring.
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