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The poet Hart Crane once called air plants, or tillandsias, a genus of the bromeliad family, an "inverted octopus with heavenward arms." Needing no soil, these amazing plants come in a variety of fantastic shapes and colors.

 

Ideas from Marigold and Mint about how to make a modern arrangement for mom with cheerful muscari and poppies. Plus: Tips for growing and harvesting muscari for arrangements.
GD advisory board sealArtist Karen Robertson, known for her nature-inspired designs, shows how to transform seaweed into artwork that will remind you of the ocean's beauty for years to come.
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This magnificent rose garden was created on the site of a family olive grove, which has been owned by the same family for half a century. Located in the San Joaquin Valley, this olive grove was originally developed by the railroads, before recently being transformed into orange groves.
Designers around the world have created whimsical Christmas trees inspired by lotus flowers, French macarons, and children's story books. Check out this assortment of unusual trees around the world.
In Fruiting Bodies, UK-based photographer Julia Claxton captures the beauty and mystery of common mushrooms.   
A photographic tour of the beautiful gardens of two Sri Lankan brothers: architect Geoffrey Bawa's Lunuganga, an English-style folly, and Bevis Bawa's Brief Garden, an unusual series of jungle garden rooms. 
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London-based artist Zadok Ben-David makes flowers and trees out of cut metal, including his best-known pieces, which feature intricate flowers, modeled after Victorian illustrations.

 

Iraqi Kurdistan, a region in northern Mesopotamia, is home to mountains, steppes, and pastures that were part of the Fertile Crescent: the birthplace of agriculture—and, indeed, civilization. There, ancient farmers nurtured a wealth of crops that would become staples throughout the world. Today, after years of wars and sanctions, Kurdistan is reengaging its land. As it negotiates the challenges of a new era, native plants and crops remain a defining feature of the landscape and people—how long can the agricultural heritage last?
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Arizona artist Kathy Klein gathers natural materials to design circular arrangements in situ. After photographing her work, she walks away. The colorful medallions are now ephemeral gifts for whoever comes along.
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