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On the grounds of a former estate outside of Philadelphia, a cadre of master gardeners presides over an oasis of earthly delights. We've put together some ideas—paired with photos—from Chanticleer that any home gardener can use to design their own spaces. 
Don't let the bugs of spring and summer get you down! Invite these 6 plants into your garden for not only their colorful and fragrant display, but also their ability to keep those uninvited mosquitos out.  
Solenostemon 'Chocolate Mint' is a rich new coleus with mahogany velvet leaves edged in chartreuse.
Lilac blue with a cream face, deep-purple blotch and clutch of whiskers, Viola Sorbet Marina Babyface is sweet beyond belief, and fragrant too. Forms a mound 6 inches high and up to 10 inches across; flowers are an inch or more wide. Very frost tolerant.
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Many botanical gardens and even city parks show off plantings of mums in the fall, so be sure to check on locations close to home. Some places go above and beyond to create eye-popping displays, such as the chrysanthemum festivals at Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania (Nov 1-21), Bellingrath Gardens and Home in Theodore, Alabama (Nov 12-25), and the Portland Japanese Garden in Oregon (Oct 9-17). The National Chrysanthemum Society also hosts an annual show (this year at Sherman Library and Gardens, Corona del Mar, California, Oct 30-31), and local chapters put on smaller shows across the country; visit mums.org to learn more. But if your love of mums can lure you across the Atlantic, then the Chrysanthema Lahr festival in Lahr, Germany, is a can’t-miss event, held from Oct 16-Nov 7 this year.
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In suburban New York, a reader grows tiers of organic vegetables that connect to a Craftsman-style house via a bridge.
Did you know that some of the plants in Harry Potter are based on real plants? We take a look at some of the crazy plants that Harry, Hermione, Ron, and the rest of the Hogwarts gang have come across in their seven volumes (and eight films) of adventures!
A look at the life-cycle of a rooftop vegetable farm for a Canadian restaurant—complete with hydroponic planters, a hoop house—including the harvest of beautiful vegetables.
With spring bringing flowers aplenty, gardeners again have the pleasure of readily available blooms begging to be brought indoors. Two books—The Natural Home and Bringing Nature Home—remind us that living with nature in the house takes many forms.
A new garden—his own—marks the next step in Piet Oudolf's constantly evolving creative journey. 
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