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Keeping a close eye on her developing progeny, this Kalanchoe succulent, nicknamed "the mother-of-thousands" is as prolific as it is maternal—hundreds of tiny plants actually grow on the mother's arms. When released, each plantlet falls to the ground to take root on its own—now the next "mother" in the lineage, never too far from home.
Fire is generally the death knell for many plants, but the beautiful flowering shrubs and trees of the genus Banksia are adapted to even thrive in wildfires—in fact, the plants need fire to reproduce.
Adored, feared, and fabled, the oleander is a deadly beauty. Drought-tolerant and easily propagated, it is commonly cultivated in gardens and public spaces in subtropical and tropical regions throughout the world and it is also considered to be one of history's deadliest plants. 
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A stunning late-season garden in a valley of the Appalachian Mountains, in North Carolina, has profuse plantings of dahlias, asters, salvia, and more. 
We talk with photographer Michel Tcherevkoff about his collection of imagined floral shoes, Shoe Fleur.
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Contemporary Swiss artists Gerda Steiner and Jorg Lenzlinger hung flowers, seeds, and branches in a 17th-century church in Venice as part of the 50th Venice Biennale. They called it Falling Garden, a world in which visitors lie in repose on the mausoleum floor, while "the garden thinks for them." 
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An exhibit at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh documents the success of a project called extInked. A social experiment and an ecological initiative, the project paired one hundred of the country's threatened flora, fauna, and fungi with volunteers that would become ambassadors for their species, with a tattoo to prove it. 
A cultivar of Iresine herbstii, which is also disturbingly called chicken gizzard and bloodleaf, ‘Blazin’ Lime’ is the new sister to the popular ‘Blazin’ Rose’. Sports lime-green leaves with cream-yellow veining on fuchsia-pink stems. Puts on the best show in light shade. Heat tolerant. Grows 1 to 2 feet tall. Annual.  simplybeautifulgardens.com

For unusual muted shades, landscape designer Stephen Suzman likes to use Echeveria ‘Afterglow’ (powdery pinkish lavender) and E. ‘Perle von Nürnberg’, pictured (grayish brown with a pinkish mauve tinge). Both form rosettes of overlapping leaves, 1 foot across for ‘Afterglow’, 5 to 6 inches for ‘Perle von Nürnberg’. provenwinners.com

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We lust over the many magnolias in the Rare Find Nursery catalog.
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