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Native (and extremely local) plants create stunning wildflower fields in 30 acres in rural Pennsylvania.
Megan Reardon, better known to the internet as Not Martha (as in Stewart, natch), shares with us how she managed to overcome her brown thumb and create a home with thriving plants. 
With its red and white blossoms, the York and Lancaster rose (Rosa damascena versicolor) marked the end of the War of the Roses, and symbolized the union of feuding families, each with their own rose: the House of York, with its white rose, and the House of Lancaster, with its red rose. 
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A British town grows vegetables that anyone can harvest, a plan to cover the Eiffel Tower in trees,  the Ice Cube video about his love for Eames, and a nine-mile park on an abandonned railway in New Haven, Connecticut.
For a conceptual art exhibit in Belgium, Tokyo-based florist and artist Makoto Azuma created two bonsai pieces using unusual techniques: ice and wires.
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The story and photographs of one reader's winter garden in Petaluma, California.
A dual exhibition at Kew Botanical Gardens features Plants in Peril and Losing Paradise, showing illustrations of endangered plants through the world. The exhibition closes March 18, 2012, so go see it if you can!
Landscape architect Jens Jensen (1860 to 1951), designer of numerous parks in Chicago (and around the country), including the Garfield Park Conservatory (above), is the subject of a new documentary, Jens Jensen: Harmonious World, which will be shown on PBS this fall. 
A photographic tour of the beautiful gardens of two Sri Lankan brothers: architect Geoffrey Bawa's Lunuganga, an English-style folly, and Bevis Bawa's Brief Garden, an unusual series of jungle garden rooms. 
Three presidents, three trees, three histories: Andew Jackson's southern magnolia, Abraham Lincoln's honey locust, and George Washington's tulip poplar.
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