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A six-story, 19th-century water tower is transformed into a funky 37-room hotel surrounded by four acres of amazing gardens in the Netherlands. 
Landscaped entirely out of cypress and eucalyptus, the enormous guitar is one Argentine farmer's love letter to his late wife, a young woman who loved the guitar.
Emotion and restraint weave through Andrea Cochran's well-edited landscapes—a look at some of the landscapes that she has designed, as well as our exclusive (and extensive) Q&A with Cochran.
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Tending Toward the Untamed: Artists Respond to the Wild Garden is a collection of work that interprets the relationship between nature and the gardener as it grows at Wave Hill, a garden overlooking the Hudson River, in Bronx, New York. Our Q&A with Jennifer McGregor, Director of Arts and Senior Curator at Wave Hill.
The patio in the Barcelona apartment of economist Peter Fehlbaum mixes modernist touches with a healthy dose of quirk. We show you how to get a similar look for your home and garden. 
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The American chestnut tree has dominated Eastern forests for centuries, but it almost disappeared when a foreign blight was introduced in 1904. Scientists have been trying to breed blight-resistant trees and recently planted several at the New York Botanical Garden, just steps from the blight's origins over one hundred years ago. 
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Superstar gardener Ken Druse tells us about why he decided to create his latest book, Natural Companions, with images by his friend Ellen Hoverkamp and her flatbed scanner: "Soon after Ellen and I finished our book, Hurricane Irene churned through the Northeast, followed the next month by tropical storm Lee. A good deal of my garden was swept away. Now I have a record of things that used to be, and the book I wrote turned out to be a memory book."
Today's links include an ingenious planter that self-waters, tips for throwing an outdoor party, and the Freedom Garden in Louisiana. 
Australian plants are like the ultimate self-sacrificing mother: They give and give (certain trees can reach 20 feet in just a few years and flower for six weeks or more) but ask so little in return. (Fertilizer? Rain? If you insist.) Their fantastical forms, however—including sculptural, hairy, or waxy blooms in neon colors—are anything but matronly.    
Portland's Rose Society was founded in 1889, and the city's collection of hybrids, floribundas, and grandifloras has been growing ever since. In 1917 the International Rose Test Garden opened as a testing ground for new varieties of roses. Some of its first plantings were rose refugees from Europe during World War I. Today, over 10,000 plants and 550 species slope towards the city's downtown horizon. 

 

 

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